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CoastieJohn

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Reply with quote  #1 
Seen this tonight.  Some serious health stuff here not too far from you guys/gals.

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/father-contracted-flesh-eating-bacteria-193157958.html

Father Who Contracted Flesh-Eating Bacteria While Crabbing in N.J. Now Faces Losing All 4 Limbs

Caitlin Keating
PeopleJuly 10, 2018

Angel Perez spent July 2 doing one of his favorite things: crabbing. But a few hours after his time in New Jersey’s Maurice River, the father’s limbs became red and raw. Then came the blisters and scarring.

Now, 60-year-old Perez is fighting for his life in the hospital and might have to his limbs amputated, his family told New Jersey Advance Media.

Perez, of Millville, contracted Vibrio necrotizing fasciitis, a rare bacterial infection, and is in critical condition at Cooper University Hospital, New Jersey Advance Media reported. He’s able to breathe on his own and communicate with his family, according to the outlet.

Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial skin infection which kills soft tissue — and quickly, often leading to death, according to the CDC. Vibrio is specifically contracted after consuming raw or undercooked seafood or exposing a wound to seawater, the CDC says.

The CDC also encourages people to avoid salty water if they have an open wound or scrapes.

“The infection has spread to his blood… his skin; you can see it spreading from his feet all the way above his kneecap. His forearms are black in color; they have blisters, cuts and sores,” his daughter Dilena Perez-Dilan told the news outlet.

RELATED: Summer Has Arrived — Here’s How to Avoid Flesh-Eating Bacteria & More Warm Weather Health Hazards

Perez-Dilan added that doctors have yet to determine if the antibiotics are working. If they don’t, Perez — who also has Parkinson’s disease — might have at least three of his limbs amputated.

She told WPVI that she wants people to know that “as much as we need water, it can be poisonous.”

“It can be dangerous and we don’t know what we’re getting into when we get in there,” Perez-Dilan told WPVI. “That’s why they do use boots — people use boots and covers to protect themselves.”

Despite Perez’s grim prognosis, Perez-Dilan told New Jersey Advance Media that her father has “been praising God non-stop.”

She added, “He’s just happy to have a second chance.”

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STRUTNRUT

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SCARY, heard of it in MD before to include deaths, one in OC couple years back
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Dirtybird420

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No offense. But if you look at a majority of the cases it’s older folks or people who aren’t around the water a lot. It’s deff scary but I think if you are in n around it you build a immune system for it. I’m poked uncountable times a year with crabs,rotten fish,rusty pots heck I sliced the crap out of my finger cutting rope off my wheel the other day. I did pour alchohol on that. Most of the problem is hygiene. Once out of the creek get a shower at some point. Cut your hand maybe some sanitizer or atleast wash em.very sad for this guy though. Stay safe.
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CoastieJohn

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I think I'd keep a few bottle of peroxide or betadine around.
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STRUTNRUT

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I think the guy in OC that died had a compromied immune system and cut his leg loading his boat up on a trailer at the end of summer.   Had a friend in his 40's here in princess  anne that got a cut from a nail on a bulkhead in the upper manokin during summer and got deathly sick but survived and didn't lose any limbs.    Remember a few years back a guy got pricked by a hardhead and didn't survive either.   Rare but still scarey, I think all those cases the people didn't go to dr or hospital until infection got serious but thats only a day or two with that stuff.    I've fished with guys that kept a bottle of rubbing alcohol on board for sticks and cuts.
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CoastieJohn

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What's a hardhead?....a catfish?
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Dirtybird420

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N yea my grandfather got a infection last year from a rockfish prick in the manokin. He went to docs next day n got it cleared up. Again my grandfather so he’s older obviously. A hard head is a croaker.
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STRUTNRUT

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atlantic croaker was in choptank if I remember right.  

acroaker.jpg



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pvtpilot

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http://ocr.org/sounds/atlantic-croaker/
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crabchip

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Reply with quote  #10 
I keep a bottle of bleach on my boat just for this reason maybe not an ideal solution but better than nothing
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BOWDEADLY

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I "HAD"a friend that was a crazy fisherman, loved his fishing, any kind. He had a soar on his leg, went fishing down the shore.
He was wading out in the water every day, came home after a week and his soar was worse. Went to the doctors to have it checked out, checked in to the ER, died two days later.
Had something to do with a blood issue from I think bacteria in his bloodstream caused by the infection.
Here how crazy he was, big guy 300 pounds 6'4.
Was in Canada ice fishing, his snowmobile went
through the ice. Went back to the motel, got changed and went right back out.
I would of been on my way home, he was a great guy.

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CoastieJohn

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Another saltwater death.  I didn't know it could kill dogs.

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/dog-owner-warns-others-saltwater-204344076.html

Dog Owner Warns Others of Saltwater Poisoning After Beloved Lab Dies After Florida Beach Visit

Kelli Bender
PeopleJuly 13, 2018
Dog Owner Warns Others of Saltwater Poisoning After Beloved Lab Dies After Florida Beach Visit





A day at the beach turned into a goodbye to a best friend for Chris Taylor.

The South Florida University student, 29, often took his water-loving Labrador retriever O.G. to the beach in Dunedin, Florida. According to WFLA, Monday was no different. After class, Taylor and O.G., who have been together for seven years, went to hang out in the sun and surf for a few hours at Honeymoon Island State Park Dog Beach.

After a great time the Lab and his owner headed home, where O.G. started vomiting and experiencing diarrhea which lasted until the next day. O.G. managed to drink some water and eat a little of the boiled chicken and rice Taylor cooked him on Tuesday, but by Wednesday the dog wasn’t eating and was wandering around almost unresponsive.

Fearing something serious, Taylor rushed his canine companion to the vet. Unfortunately, it was too late: The vet revealed to Taylor that his dog was suffering from saltwater poisoning.

Salt poisoning, as Pet Poison Hotline points out, can be very damaging to dogs and cats.

According to the site, “salt poisoning in dogs and cats results in clinical signs of vomiting, diarrhea, inappetence, lethargy, walking drunk, abnormal fluid accumulation within the body, excessive thirst or urination, potential injury to the kidneys, tremors, seizures, coma, and even death when untreated.”

Pets can get salt poisoning from ingesting larger amounts of saltwater. This was the case with O.G., who, even though he had been to the beach countless times, accidentally took in too much water during his last visit.

By the time the black Lab got to the vet, he was dehydrated and suffering brain damage and seizures. Nothing could be done to save him.

“They told me, there’s nothing we can do right now. I thought, this is my son. I don’t have children of my own,” Taylor told WFLA.

After having lost his best furry friend, Taylor is sharing O.G.’s story to prevent saltwater poisoning from killing other pets.

Vets recommend limiting your pet’s time at the beach and in the water to just one or two hours to prevent saltwater poisoning. This illness can appear to come on gradually, which means it is often too late to help an affected animal by the time they arrive at the vet, as saltwater poisoning can quickly affect the brain.

If you suspect your pet might be suffering from saltwater poisoning it is important to get them to the vet as soon as possible so the “careful administration of IV fluids, electrolyte monitoring, treatment for dehydration and brain swelling, and supportive care” necessary can begin, according to Pet Poison Hotline.

A day at the beach turned into a goodbye to a best friend for Chris Taylor

A day at the beach turned into a goodbye to a best friend for Chris Taylor.

The South Florida University student, 29, often took his water-loving Labrador retriever O.G. to the beach in Dunedin, Florida. According to WFLA, Monday was no different. After class, Taylor and O.G., who have been together for seven years, went to hang out in the sun and surf for a few hours at Honeymoon Island State Park Dog Beach.

After a great time the Lab and his owner headed home, where O.G. started vomiting and experiencing diarrhea which lasted until the next day. O.G. managed to drink some water and eat a little of the boiled chicken and rice Taylor cooked him on Tuesday, but by Wednesday the dog wasn’t eating and was wandering around almost unresponsive.

Fearing something serious, Taylor rushed his canine companion to the vet. Unfortunately, it was too late: The vet revealed to Taylor that his dog was suffering from saltwater poisoning.

Salt poisoning, as Pet Poison Hotline points out, can be very damaging to dogs and cats.

According to the site, “salt poisoning in dogs and cats results in clinical signs of vomiting, diarrhea, inappetence, lethargy, walking drunk, abnormal fluid accumulation within the body, excessive thirst or urination, potential injury to the kidneys, tremors, seizures, coma, and even death when untreated.”

Pets can get salt poisoning from ingesting larger amounts of saltwater. This was the case with O.G., who, even though he had been to the beach countless times, accidentally took in too much water during his last visit.

By the time the black Lab got to the vet, he was dehydrated and suffering brain damage and seizures. Nothing could be done to save him.

“They told me, there’s nothing we can do right now. I thought, this is my son. I don’t have children of my own,” Taylor told WFLA.

After having lost his best furry friend, Taylor is sharing O.G.’s story to prevent saltwater poisoning from killing other pets.

Vets recommend limiting your pet’s time at the beach and in the water to just one or two hours to prevent saltwater poisoning. This illness can appear to come on gradually, which means it is often too late to help an affected animal by the time they arrive at the vet, as saltwater poisoning can quickly affect the brain.

If you suspect your pet might be suffering from saltwater poisoning it is important to get them to the vet as soon as possible so the “careful administration of IV fluids, electrolyte monitoring, treatment for dehydration and brain swelling, and supportive care” necessary can begin, according to Pet Poison Hotline.

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Scamp

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoastieJohn
What's a hardhead?....a catfish?

Lol. Here in Southern Maryland they call croakers hardheads. Good eating fish, drum family.

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Scamp

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Reply with quote  #14 
Any day, but especially weekends, I see lots of people swimming in the Bay. Even little kids. There is no sign that warns swimmers of any danger.


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CoastieJohn

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scamp

Lol. Here in Southern Maryland they call croakers hardheads. Good eating fish, drum family.


We got croakers down in Florida...never called them hardheads though....just croakers.
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Dirtybird420

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scamp
Any day, but especially weekends, I see lots of people swimming in the Bay. Even little kids. There is no sign that warns swimmers of any danger.


Yup n u thankfully seldom here a thing. It’s a freak accident type thing. Go swimming n when u get out wash ur azz. N if u get cut clean it. Sounds normal. There’s always that freak accident but if u take care of the problem n r healthy no prob. Lady 3 doors down lost her foot a few years ago. I’ve swam in this creek since I could swim. It’s all luck of the draw.
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